Freakin Frack
May 15, 2014
engineeringisawesome:

This 3D-Printed Cast Uses Ultrasound to Heal Your Bones 40% Faster

3D-printed casts (an idea that’s been around for a couple years now) could alleviate the odor and itch issues caused by plaster casts, but even though they’re not widely available yet,Turkish student Deniz Karasahin has already taken the idea a step further. winner of the 2014 Golden A’Design Award, Karasahin’s Osteoid cast prototype uses tiny ultrasonic vibrations to speed up bone healing time by up to 40 percent.
The bone healing capabilities of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) have been known for decades, but the treatment is difficult to administer because it requires ultrasound leads to be placed on the skin, directly over the injured area of the bone. With traditional plaster casts this is basically impossible, but a 3D-printed cast that leaves patches of skin open would make it easy. Osteoid’s simple, skeletal design allows ultrasonic drivers to be built directly into the cast.
It’s still just a design prototype at this point, but given the rapid pace at which 3D scanning and printing technologies are progressing, we wouldn’t be surprised to start seeing these kinds of casts adorning the arms of reckless people all over the globe within the next year or two.

Digital Trends

engineeringisawesome:

This 3D-Printed Cast Uses Ultrasound to Heal Your Bones 40% Faster

3D-printed casts (an idea that’s been around for a couple years now) could alleviate the odor and itch issues caused by plaster casts, but even though they’re not widely available yet,Turkish student Deniz Karasahin has already taken the idea a step further. winner of the 2014 Golden A’Design Award, Karasahin’s Osteoid cast prototype uses tiny ultrasonic vibrations to speed up bone healing time by up to 40 percent.

The bone healing capabilities of low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) have been known for decades, but the treatment is difficult to administer because it requires ultrasound leads to be placed on the skin, directly over the injured area of the bone. With traditional plaster casts this is basically impossible, but a 3D-printed cast that leaves patches of skin open would make it easy. Osteoid’s simple, skeletal design allows ultrasonic drivers to be built directly into the cast.

It’s still just a design prototype at this point, but given the rapid pace at which 3D scanning and printing technologies are progressing, we wouldn’t be surprised to start seeing these kinds of casts adorning the arms of reckless people all over the globe within the next year or two.

Digital Trends

May 3, 2014

I love American Hustle!!

I love American Hustle!!

(Source: bisonbacon, via onlylolgifs)

March 25, 2014
bunnyfood:

(via 4gifs:video)

bunnyfood:

(via 4gifs:video)

(Source: ForGIFs.com)

March 24, 2014
March 12, 2014
when I go to a meeting that runs over lunch and see they’re not providing food

thisadvertisinglife:

image

This gif came by way of Anna Powers! Thanks a mil!

March 11, 2014

(Source: adumbscotts, via onlylolgifs)

March 9, 2014
March 7, 2014
when you think you’re in the clear at the end of a project but then last last minute changes come through

thisadvertisinglife:

image

March 4, 2014
beatonna:

aubreylstallard:

James Ensor

"What’s going on here" is a bad question, the better question is "what’s not going on."

beatonna:

aubreylstallard:

James Ensor

"What’s going on here" is a bad question, the better question is "what’s not going on."

(Source: belgianpaintings)

March 3, 2014